The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Category: Early Albany Settlers

  • Black Anderson: A Story of the South Coast – Part 2b

    A 2022/3 Revision of one of the South Coast’s most disreputable historical characters Anderson and the ‘second wave’ at the South Coast  1833-1835 Part 2 (a,b&c) of this challenging post is dedicated to John Robertson and the publication of Sealed Souls, his insightful and highly informative compendium of narrative chapters and exhaustive supporting glossaries which tell…

  • Black Anderson: A Story of the South Coast – Part 2a

    A 2022/3 Revision of one of the South Coast’s most disreputable historical characters Earliest Maritime Albany  1831-1834   Above: King George Sound has always held a majestic vista. Ship’s captains were able to glean fair impression of the places they were due to visit from the charts they worked, and King George Sound promised much,…

  • John Bailey Pavey (1797-1882) by Campbell (Jock) Beer

    John Bailey Pavey, also known as John/Jack Williams, John Andrews and John Williams Andrews was a mariner, sealer, whaler and Plantagenet pioneer. A key figure of Albany’s original criminal fringe he was a man of considerable, and dangerous, prowess. Pavey resided at or near Albany between 1834 and his death in 1882.   With Thanks…

  • A short history of Aboriginal relations along the South Coast through the story of the Albany Aborigine Norngern and his King George Town contemporaries

    Tommy King was Norngern, and Norn was Wandinyilmernong.   This is a modified version of a piece submitted to Vol. 33 of  the academic journal Studies in Western Australian History during 2019. The edition, called ‘Albany: an antipodean Arcadia‘ edited by Malcom Traille and Harry Freemantle, carries a range of works from writers in some…

  • Whalemen, Jumpships and Albany’s Old Waterfront Precinct

    An important off-cut from the Newhill/Newell project – 2019/20   Above: Albany’s waterfront precinct  cut from Albany 30A, King George’s Sound as marked by Philip Chauncy, Assistant Surveyor, 1851. Source: State Records Office of W.A.     AS we have seen from our investigations into 1830s and 1840s Albany, behind the imaginary fascia of the…

  • Jimmy’s Harbour – Part 3: Summary & Conclusion

    It was Newell, then became Newhill.   The argument was opened by the mid-20th Century Albany historian Robert Stephens who, while establishing his accountancy business during 1935, spotted something in the early settlement papers he was perusing and decided rather than Jimmy Newhill, an old German working-class Catholic whose aging wife was still living out…

  • Jimmy’s Harbour – Newhill or Newell? Part 2

    Continued from Part 1   Whalemen, rebellion and Albany’s original newspaper; Jimmy (Ned) Newhill and 1880’s Albany   Above: Edward August Newhill, known among his friends and family as Jimmy, was granted title to the harbour after camping, fishing and hiding deserting whalemen there during the 1880s, but Newhill also led one of the single…

  • Jimmy’s Harbour – Newell or Newhill? Part 1

    An un-won argument and the Newell family of early Albany   Above: Stockphoto of “Jimmy Newhill’s Harbour” drawn from the West Australian Government website Beachsafe.Org.Au  The photo is one of very few taken oceanside, looking northward into the mouth of the locally famous cove.   Introduction   As the settlement at King George Sound begins…

  • In Search of Ngurabirding – Part 2

    The Hay River Brigade   Before we go on with the story of John Maher after the issuing of his Ticket-of-Leave, it’s important to look into what had already taken place at Albany relative to his arrival. This applies to the earliest period of free settlement and the story of the Spencer family, in particular, who…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – Part 2

    Originally Published 30 April 2015: The 1840s   Above: The Lower Kalgan River meanders past Mount Boyle into Oyster Harbour and King George’s Sound reflecting the rural idyll of old Albany. Campbell Taylor’s childhood home lay on the upper part of the hill. Built in 1837 by his father Patrick, the living room gave commanding views,…