The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Category: Lockyer’s Pirates

  • Black Anderson: A Story of the South Coast – Part 1

    A 2022/23 revision of one of the South Coast’s most disreputable historical characters   Introduction, Contemporary Assessment and Historiography   Above: The identity of ‘John William ‘Black Jack’ Anderson and the story of his arrival along Western Australia’s South Coast is slowly being pieced together. Long a figure of intrigue and mystery, Anderson was perhaps…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – 3 (c)

    Bob Gamble, John Bailey Pavey & Black Jack Anderson   Above: The story of Truganini, perhaps Australia’s best known female Aboriginal ancestor, extends through her sisters and other women like her, via Kangaroo Island, all the way to King George’s Sound. Cartoon image by Chris Grosz, taken from the politics, society and culture magazine The Monthly, May, 2012. While the…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – 3 (b)

    The Sealers of the Schooner’s Hunter and Governor Brisbane 1825-26   Above: Part of a sealing gang captured in full flight. Probably American, the gang are thought to be clubbing Cape Fur Seals off Namibia sometime in the early 1800’s. Image uncredited and taken from The Seals of Nam website. King George’s Sound was settled some years before Robert Gamble became known there, so…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – 3 (a)

    From New Zealand and Bass Strait to Kangaroo Island, Middle Island and King George’s Sound   Above: The business of hunting fur seals boomed in the 1790s, arriving in Australian waters around 1798. At the time seal rookeries were crowded and hundreds of thousands of  the animals were slaughtered in the opening years. Australian sealers…

  • The Major’s Butterflies Beat Him Down

    Major Lockyer and the story of the Amity anchoring in the large harbour at King George’s Sound on Christmas Day 1826 holds nothing new.  Everyone who lives at Albany knows of the replica vessel down by the shore in the so-called historical precinct, as does (practically) everyone who has ever come to play tourist. I didn’t particularly want to…

  • Rough Men in Small Boats

    Originally Published 7 April 2014: So, it was the great French and British maritime explorers who gave name to most of the coastal sites we are concerned with and recognise today.  I’m going to stay with the foreign influence as the trade in fur-seal pelts is largely about that, but first want to establish a…