The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Category: Patrick Taylor

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – Part 2

    Originally Published 30 April 2015: The 1840s   Above: The Lower Kalgan River meanders past Mount Boyle into Oyster Harbour and King George’s Sound reflecting the rural idyll of old Albany. Campbell Taylor’s childhood home lay on the upper part of the hill. Built in 1837 by his father Patrick, the living room gave commanding views,…

  • Interlude

    Originally Published 16 July 2014:   I fell for Campbell Taylor’s history for a whole lot of reasons, not least because he was among a select group of sons to first Albany settlers.  These sons will come to occupy slabs of space in future history books relating to settlement along the South Coast, but only…

  • The Supporting Cast

    Originally Published 27 June 2014: Other people who are relevant to these pages during the 1840’s and onwards include the ex naval Lieutenant Peter Belches and the former East India Company men John Laurence Morley and Thomas Lyell Symers. We’re also interested in what Captain John Hassell and his wife Ellen got up to, what developments George Cheyne was able to forge and the…

  • An All-Australian Story

    Originally Published 20 June 2014:     The story behind Albany’s early characters, both European and Indigenous, has as much about it as any great Australian drama. Most readers should now recognise the centrality of the Taylor’s of Candyup to this work. The experience of the Taylor’s tells an inclusive story of Albany, which in…

  • Prelude and Postscript to a Wedding

    Originally Published 4 June 2014:   I thought I’d deviate for a moment and try and pull Patrick’s epic year of 1837 a little more together. That way it’s done properly and I won’t need to come back to it. It’ll be worth it, because this was no ordinary time. Specifically, I want to try…

  • Love and War – Henry Camfield’s View

    Originally Published  28 May 2014: Above: Henry Camfield spent ten years roaming the Swan River, Van Diemen’s Land and New South Wales looking for love. When he found it, it came in the form of an orphan girl, Annie Breeze, but there were to be no children of their own. Painting; The Lovers, by Willliam Powell Frith.   As…

  • More thoughts on the Taylor slave money and Patrick’s time at Albany

    Originally Posted 24 May 2014: The Caribbean Connection There is an obvious contradiction between the gaining of Patrick Taylor’s father’s wealth in the business of trading slaves and the pursuit of freedom for Polly Graham, his mixed-race wife and lover owned by his cousin Simon. John Taylor was driven first and foremost by the pursuit…

  • The Demise Of The Taylor Fortune: Part 2

    Originally Posted 22 May 2014:   The Bussell’s were lucky to get something of a windfall every time one of the children turned 21, but by 1837 the reverend’s life-insurance policy had paid out in full and without Capel Carter back in England sending their goods and offering her help they were well and truly…

  • The Demise Of The Taylor Fortune: Part 1

    Originally Posted 18 May 2014:   For now, back to the love story of Patrick Taylor and Mary Bussell. We know the two met on the ship James Pattison which arrived in Albany on June 19th, 1834, after eighteen and a half weeks at sea. Of their individual stories we know Mary was the second eldest…

  • More thoughts on the origin of the name Glen Candy

    Originally Published 18 April 2014: CANDY is an acknowledged borrowing from Arabic qandi (candied).  The word developed from the CANE of sugar-cane (stalk-Genesis41:5).   Patrick Taylor left Spithead, Portsmouth, on February 9th, 1834, aboard the James Pattison arriving at the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, 13 weeks later. He celebrated his 27th birthday on March 2nd, exactly three…