The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Tag: Kalgan River

  • Mokare’s Mob – Part 4a

    Mokare and Dr Alexander Collie (1793-1835)   And so to Dr Collie himself, Albany’s original ailing academic. Doctor, botanist and casual explorer, by the early 1830s Collie had become a reknown natural history collector as well. His naval experience aboard HMS Blossom cruising the coasts of the Americas, including the Pacific Islands and far north,…

  • In Search of Ngurabirding – Part 3

    Moorilup   In our search for Ngurabirding we are building  background to the arrival of his father, Ticket-of-leave man John Maher, in the Albany area during 1854. Maher took up work as a farm labourer or shepherd on one of the Spencer sheep runs closer to Mount Barker, north of the main settlement. Last post…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – Part 1

    Originally Published 01 March 2015: East Along The Coast   Above: Cape Arid featuring Middle Island and the eastwards view toward Point Malcolm. This is the place where Aboriginal and Settler historical records along the South Coast began and where the story of one particular pioneer, Campbell Taylor, stands out. Photo courtesy Dirk Veltcamp, Panoramio 2008 There…

  • The Supporting Cast

    Originally Published 27 June 2014: Other people who are relevant to these pages during the 1840’s and onwards include the ex naval Lieutenant Peter Belches and the former East India Company men John Laurence Morley and Thomas Lyell Symers. We’re also interested in what Captain John Hassell and his wife Ellen got up to, what developments George Cheyne was able to forge and the…

  • Prelude and Postscript to a Wedding

    Originally Published 4 June 2014:   I thought I’d deviate for a moment and try and pull Patrick’s epic year of 1837 a little more together. That way it’s done properly and I won’t need to come back to it. It’ll be worth it, because this was no ordinary time. Specifically, I want to try…

  • Upriver

    Originally Posted 24 April 2014: Three Things Relative To The Period 1834-1841: Part 2 It’s not a great picture, I know, but the view from Mount Clarence looking north offers a glimpse of two distant ranges. The nearer and smaller of the two (out of view to the left) is the Porongurups; the larger and…

  • More thoughts on the origin of the name Glen Candy

    Originally Published 18 April 2014: CANDY is an acknowledged borrowing from Arabic qandi (candied).  The word developed from the CANE of sugar-cane (stalk-Genesis41:5).   Patrick Taylor left Spithead, Portsmouth, on February 9th, 1834, aboard the James Pattison arriving at the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, 13 weeks later. He celebrated his 27th birthday on March 2nd, exactly three…

  • Glen Candy, Candyup and the Lower Kalgan River

    Originally published 14 April 2014: ” Every breath Patrick Taylor took filled him with joy. Having just turned twenty-seven, he had not only survived the voyage to the Swan River Colony but reversed his condition in the process. He was religious, had always believed, but since meeting Mary Bussell the glory of God had surpassed all…

  • King Georges Sound, Oyster Harbour and John Septimus Roe – Part 1

    Originally Published: March/April 2014 We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love… and then we return home.  Australian Aboriginal Proverb   The first story in the ‘OUTDONE’ collection is called ‘Time and Place’.  I called it that…