The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Tag: Oyster Harbour

  • Sound As A Bell

    ‘The Sound’ by Sarah Drummond (a book review) Albany writer Sarah Drummond’s first novel, The Sound, stares into and stirs the dark waters of the town’s immediate pre-history, resolving to tell a harsh and uncomfortable truth. Her subject is the Breaksea Island sealing gangs, the 19th Century story of a girl and another young Aboriginal…

  • Mokare’s Mob – Part 2

      Mokare- His character and influence    Above: Louis de-Sainson’s  Albany Aborigines sketched in October 1826, coloured and printed 1833. The images are of Mokare (bottom right); Patyet, thought to be Nakinah (bottom left); and young brother Yallapoli with the brothers’ father, also named Patyet (middle). The two men at the top are unidentified but…

  • Mokare’s Mob – Part 1

    Mokare: 1800 – 1831 Not since the time of Mokare has there been more future driven anxiety facing the South Coast’s Indigenous. As final deliberation on the Single Noongar Claim looms, Western Australia’s South-Western Aborigines face acceptance of the decades long Native Title case against the Government of Australia, an issue as much rooted in the story of Mokare…

  • Glen Candy, Candyup and the Lower Kalgan River

    Originally published 14 April 2014: ” Every breath Patrick Taylor took filled him with joy. Having just turned twenty-seven, he had not only survived the voyage to the Swan River Colony but reversed his condition in the process. He was religious, had always believed, but since meeting Mary Bussell the glory of God had surpassed all…

  • The Major’s Butterflies Beat Him Down

    Major Lockyer and the story of the Amity anchoring in the large harbour at King George’s Sound on Christmas Day 1826 holds nothing new.  Everyone who lives at Albany knows of the replica vessel down by the shore in the so-called historical precinct, as does (practically) everyone who has ever come to play tourist. I didn’t particularly want to…

  • Rough Men in Small Boats

    Originally Published 7 April 2014: So, it was the great French and British maritime explorers who gave name to most of the coastal sites we are concerned with and recognise today.  I’m going to stay with the foreign influence as the trade in fur-seal pelts is largely about that, but first want to establish a…

  • King Georges Sound, Oyster Harbour and John Septimus Roe – Part 2

    Originally published: 2 April 2014 A word about those early navigators … When relating Roe’s maritime experience it’s important to talk a little about the great French and British pelagic explorers, the great navigators and cartographers of the 1700’s who charted most of the south seas and are remembered in a thousand-and-one local histories around…