The View From Mount Clarence

A look back at settlement along Western Australia's South Coast

Tag: Sealers

  • Black Anderson: A Story of the South Coast – Part 2a

    A 2022/3 Revision of one of the South Coast’s most disreputable historical characters Earliest Maritime Albany  1831-1834   Above: King George Sound has always held a majestic vista. Ship’s captains were able to glean fair impression of the places they were due to visit from the charts they worked, and King George Sound promised much,…

  • John Bailey Pavey (1797-1882) by Campbell (Jock) Beer

    John Bailey Pavey, also known as John/Jack Williams, John Andrews and John Williams Andrews was a mariner, sealer, whaler and Plantagenet pioneer. A key figure of Albany’s original criminal fringe he was a man of considerable, and dangerous, prowess. Pavey resided at or near Albany between 1834 and his death in 1882.   With Thanks…

  • Black Anderson: A Story of the South Coast – Part 1

    A 2022/23 revision of one of the South Coast’s most disreputable historical characters   Introduction, Contemporary Assessment and Historiography   Above: The identity of ‘John William ‘Black Jack’ Anderson and the story of his arrival along Western Australia’s South Coast is slowly being pieced together. Long a figure of intrigue and mystery, Anderson was perhaps…

  • Jimmy’s Harbour – Newell or Newhill? Part 1

    An un-won argument and the Newell family of early Albany   Above: Stockphoto of “Jimmy Newhill’s Harbour” drawn from the West Australian Government website Beachsafe.Org.Au  The photo is one of very few taken oceanside, looking northward into the mouth of the locally famous cove.   Introduction   As the settlement at King George Sound begins…

  • Sound As A Bell

    ‘The Sound’ by Sarah Drummond (a book review) Albany writer Sarah Drummond’s first novel, The Sound, stares into and stirs the dark waters of the town’s immediate pre-history, resolving to tell a harsh and uncomfortable truth. Her subject is the Breaksea Island sealing gangs, the 19th Century story of a girl and another young Aboriginal…

  • In Search of Ngurabirding-Part 4(b)

    This post is continued from Part 4 (a) previous: John McKail and George Cheyne: Town, Sea or Land?   Above: John McKail arrived at Albany immediately prior to the 19th Century’s great off-shore whaling boom (1836-1842), a phenomena which should have resulted in much greater migration of moneyed settlers to the area despite world-wide economic…

  • Campbell Taylor and the Cape Arid Connection – 3 (b)

    The Sealers of the Schooner’s Hunter and Governor Brisbane 1825-26   Above: Part of a sealing gang captured in full flight. Probably American, the gang are thought to be clubbing Cape Fur Seals off Namibia sometime in the early 1800’s. Image uncredited and taken from The Seals of Nam website. King George’s Sound was settled some years before Robert Gamble became known there, so…

  • The Major’s Butterflies Beat Him Down

    Major Lockyer and the story of the Amity anchoring in the large harbour at King George’s Sound on Christmas Day 1826 holds nothing new.  Everyone who lives at Albany knows of the replica vessel down by the shore in the so-called historical precinct, as does (practically) everyone who has ever come to play tourist. I didn’t particularly want to…

  • Rough Men in Small Boats

    Originally Published 7 April 2014: So, it was the great French and British maritime explorers who gave name to most of the coastal sites we are concerned with and recognise today.  I’m going to stay with the foreign influence as the trade in fur-seal pelts is largely about that, but first want to establish a…

  • Those Other French Guys

    Originally published 5 April 2014;   There are two other French excursionists I need to mention. One is Bruny d’Entrecasteaux, the other Jules d’Urville. These voyagers didn’t do anything in particular to influence settlement. They just visited, gave names to the most obvious geographic features they came across, collected specimens of flora and fauna, drew…